“Harriet The Spy” Tomato Sandwich

by Cara Nicoletti on May 22, 2014

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There are a handful of things that I do when I’m feeling really, really bad. I take a walk to the Brooklyn waterfront and climb the flimsy fence to sit on a rock and look at Manhattan across the water. I go to the farmers market to squeeze things, or the bookstore to smell things. I find the saddest plant in the hardware store and bring it home to my sunny kitchen to re-pot it, even though my windowsills are full. I make something my mom used to make me when I was a kid, like milky breakfast tea and cheese-toast, or I scrub my apartment until my knuckles hurt.
A lot of people (Beyonce included) like to say that all they want in life is to be happy, and that’s a good, honest desire, but just wanting it isn’t always enough. The thing that no one likes to say, is that sometimes you have to work at being happy.

When none of my usual happiness tricks work, I turn to the books I know best for comfort—the ones whose bindings are burst and pages are frayed. Often they’re serious, grown-up books—Slouching Towards Bethlehem or “The Fact of a Doorframe,” but the other day it was Harriet the Spy that pulled me out of my pity-hole.

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No one knows a crap day like eleven-year-old Harriet M. Welsch—her spiral into isolation and despair is epic. First, she loses her beloved nanny, Golly, then she loses her spy notebook, which leads to her losing her best friends, which causes her parents to take away the spy notebook again, which nearly causes her to lose her entire identity. I read this book so many times between second and fifth grade that, to this day, I can recite whole passages from memory. When I picked it up the other day, though, I hadn’t read it in years, and I was surprised by how much I still liked it.

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In the past year, I’ve had to re-read a lot of my childhood favorites as research for Voracious (tough life), and to be honest, not many of them stood the test of time. Little Women was dull, Blubber was an anxiety nightmare, Where the Red Fern Grows didn’t even come close to making me cry. Even as a twenty-eight year old, though, Harriet the Spy still spoke to me. The observations that Harriet jots down in her spy notebook about strangers in New York City are brutal and hysterically funny, maybe even more so now that I am adult living in this weird place. While on a bus to Far Rockaway with Golly, Harriet observes:

MAN WITH ROLLED WHITE SOCKS, FAT LEGS. WOMAN WITH ONE CROSSED-EYE AND A LONG NOSE. HORRIBLE LOOKING LITTLE BOY AND A FAT BLONDE MOTHER WHO KEEPS WIPING HIS NOSE OFF. FUNNYLADY LOOKS LIKE A TEACHER AND IS READING. I DON’T THINK I’D LIKE TO LIVE WHERE ANY OF THESE PEOPLE LIVE OR DO THE THINGS THEY DO. I BET THAT LITTLE BOY IS SAD AND CRIES A LOT. I BET THAT LADY WITH THE CROSS-EYE LOOKS IN THE MIRROR AND JUST FEELS TERRIBLE.

This is gold.

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Because Harriet is hyper-aware of the world around her, she isn’t exactly a carefree, light-hearted child. She is adventurous and brave, smart, cruel, insightful—but she is certainly not the happy-go-lucky heroine of many children’s books. One of the things that keeps Harriet steady is routine, specifically food routines. “Every day at threeforty she had cake and milk. Harriet loved doing everything every day in the same way.” Harriet has also eaten a tomato sandwich every single day for the past five years—she likes it the way she likes it: white bread, mayo, tomatoes. This exasperates Harriet’s mother, who pleads with her “to try a ham sandwich, or egg salad, or peanut-butter” to no avail. Because of this book, I ate my fair share of tomato and mayo sandwiches throughout elementary school (and also took to wearing headbands, striped thermals, and orange pants when the movie came out in 1996).

After re-reading the book the other day, I decided to make myself a tomato sandwich for old-time’s sake, and guess what? It was still delicious. Good, ugly summer tomatoes are finally appearing in the markets, which makes all the difference in the world for a sandwich where the tomato is the main event rather than a “lettuce and tomato” afterthought. As a grown up, I wanted a little bit more, so I added some lemony pea shoots for acidity and bite, and fried capers for a briny crunch. Harriet most definitely would not approve, but I think you will.

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Harriet the Spy Tomato Sandwiches
Makes 3 Sandwhiches
Ingredients
3 oz capers, drained, rinsed, and patted dry
canola oil (enough to fill a small skillet up to ½ inch)
8 oz peashoots
2 teaspoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
6 slices bread
mayonnaise
3 ripe tomatoes
Black pepper to taste

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Directions:
First, fry your capers. Make sure your capers are thoroughly rinsed, you want to lessen the aggressive saltiness. Also be sure to pat them dry to keep the hot oil from spitting when the moisture hits it.
Fill a small saucepan with ½ inch of oil and heat it until it reaches 350F.
Lower your capers into the oil with a slotted spoon and stand back—the oil will spit no matter how dry your capers are.
Cook for 1-2 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the capers are golden brown.
Remove them with a slotted spoon and transfer to a paper towel to drain.

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Assembly:
Toss your pea shoots in lemon juice and set aside.
Spread mayonnaise on both sides of your bread.
Slice the tomatoes and divide them between the three bottom slices of bread.
Pile the lemony peashoots and fried capers on top of the tomatoes, season with fresh black pepper to taste (it shouldn’t need salt because of the capers). Top with remaining bread slices and enjoy.

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Leave a Comment

Noodle May 22, 2014 at 11:43 am

Wonderful post, Cara. Won’t be long till we are grabbing those heirlooms at the Little Compton stand and devouring multiple Harriet the Spy Sandwiches !

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Emily K May 22, 2014 at 11:45 am

This. sounds. so. good. I often turn to a tomato + mayo sandwich on good sourdough in the summer, but I’m DYING to try one with fried capers! Brilliant!

Wanna rewatch the HTS movie this weekend?

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Cara Nicoletti May 22, 2014 at 10:05 pm

YUP I RULLY DO

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Emily K May 22, 2014 at 11:45 am

PS Noodle’s comment made me cry a little.

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Deb May 22, 2014 at 2:01 pm

it feels like yesterday that you were wearing orange. Gonna go comfort myself with a
tomato sandwich -

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Elizabeth Aquino May 22, 2014 at 2:15 pm

Oh, you’re brilliant. This sounds divine.

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Anna May 22, 2014 at 2:26 pm

Tomato sandwiches are fantastic. I got introduced to the tomato sandwich when I worked for a tearoom run by a British ex-pat when I was in high school. Good tomatoes can definitely stand on their own in a sandwich, but your version sounds pretty fantastic. Haven’t read Harriet the Spy in years, but now I might have to go back and give it another look.

After reading this, I’m tempted to go through some of my old childhood favourites and look for foods. There’s a lot of food descriptions in The Secret Garden….

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Anne May 23, 2014 at 11:11 pm

Love this post Cara. It inspired me to be a bit more personally open and sharing on my blog which I tend not to be. Tomato sandwiches are the best. When I was a kid (in Australia) me and my next door best friend used to pinch the just delivered bread from the bread bin, usually still warm and make tomato sandwiches with it – in the days when bakers delivered bread and that bread was white and doughy.

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Vivian May 28, 2014 at 5:39 pm

Deliciously beautiful! You’re amazing cara so talented!

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Sally - My Custard Pie June 9, 2014 at 1:50 am

I love a good plain tomato sandwich with the ripe juice leaching into the bread. Harriet’s food routines sound like my daughter who eats the same thing day in day out for years and then changes to another favourite. Working at being happy is something I relate to a lot – and browsing the shelves of the cook book section of a huge shop here is one activity I turn to when feeling like the world is overwhelming.
Found your blog when researching food for book club. Whoever chooses the book hosts the discussion and cooks the food themed if possible to the title. My choice was The Goldfinch. Sadly spaghetti Carbonara fo 10 people is impractical, as is filling lots of tiny pasta tubes. I went for Texas Brisket – a tenuous link to the continent, but put alcohol in every course. I suppose we could have skipped the food and just hit the bottle (of varying sizes!). So glad that Donna Tartt led to Yummy Books.

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Eboni Booth June 15, 2014 at 10:38 am

oh my goodness, how is it possible that i still haven’t read “harriet the spy”? love this entry and love this recipe. i always enjoy hearing what people do to break a funk. lately i’ve been relying on “scandal” repeats and forever 21 therapy, but man, harriet sounds like a much better idea!

another summer reading list addition!

xoxo

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Ileana June 25, 2014 at 11:08 am

This is so great! I need to read this book. I think I read it once as a kid but don’t remember it well.

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Megan July 15, 2014 at 4:41 am

Wow, I love this – Harriet the Spy informed and inspired most of my psychology during the 4th and 5th grade years, when I would wander the neighborhood streets and pathetically make sarcastic notes in my “notebook.” :) I was always jealous that she had had afternoon cake snacks available to her in the afternoons, and the egg creams.

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Megan July 15, 2014 at 4:44 am

P.S. -I can’t neglect mentioning that her literary use of proverbs (in The Long Secret) was genius. Maybe you can make a clambake post out of that one.

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Chels August 1, 2014 at 3:30 pm

Thanks for this :) I still love Harriet the Spy, too. I eat many a tomato-mayo sandwich and always think of her.

When I need a comfy old friend of a book, I read “The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar & Six More” (Roald Dahl) or “Charmed Life” (Diana Wynne Jones).

I love this blog. Cheers.

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